Saturday, August 8, 2020

How to make your ugly exhibition shell scheme look amazing

 

If you’ve ever exhibited at an event, or even if you have ever attended any kind of exhibition, you will certainly have come across a shell scheme. It is the most common type of booth that a business can book at a trade show. But in a battle for show-visitor attention, how can you make an impact with a standard shell scheme booth?

The first thing to say is that booking a shell scheme is not by any means a bad option – it’s what you do with the space that makes the difference. Shell schemes are an excellent choice for smaller businesses on a budget, and in many cases might be preferable to a space only option.

However, shell schemes have their advantages. If you’re new to exhibiting then a shell scheme is a cost-effective and easy way to test the water without having to take too much of a risk. As shell schemes include stand walls, lighting, carpet, furniture and electrics, they are the exhibiting equivalent of an all-inclusive holiday package.

But you’d be wrong to think the world of shell schemes is only for small businesses on a tight budget. Quite often you’ll also see larger companies using them as well. Don’t think that just because you’re exhibiting with a shell scheme you’re going to look like the unwanted guest at a wedding that no-one wants to talk to.

Try not to Get Boxed in – what everybody with a shell scheme does

 

Basically, a shell scheme is a crate style configuration, comprised of aluminum shafts holding all the infil boards together. In its common state, it looks . . . all things considered, similar to a case. What's more, as all the shell plans are close to one another, it implies you will be encircled by part of other indistinguishable looking boxes. It's all tasteless and nonexclusive.

 

As the general purpose of a presentation is to separate yourself and attract the groups then this can represent somewhat of an issue.

 

So what do most exhibitors do with their shell scheme? Some will stand up a couple of banners and position two or three roller flags at the front of their stall. This implies they will display with a great deal of clear space left on the divider – a genuine misuse of a chance. Try not to do this. This is what could be compared to going up to a prospective employee meeting in a savvy shirt and tie while wearing tracksuit bottoms and dingy mentors.

 

Numerous exhibitors will essentially select shell plot designs. Despite the fact that this at any rate gives you a marked domain, as these illustrations sit between the edges it implies they are separated by the aluminum posts. This is one of the primary restrictions with a shell plot corner… the vertical aluminum post development simply isn't the best structure for including designs.

One approach to balance this is to cover within the corner with consistent shell plot designs. This is positively a stage up from the fundamental shell scheme illustrations, as it conceals the unattractive shell plot structure.

 

In any case, the issue with this choice is that the consistent shell scheme illustrations don't generally sit very well on the shell plot dividers. On the off chance that the structure isn't completely square and level, at that point there will be waves and wrinkles on the illustrations divider. Regardless of whether you figure out how to maintain a strategic distance from this, you're still just left with level marked dividers with no structure highlights, which is not really the most motivating approach to show.

 

Another choice is to go through basic pop edges, which can sit before the shell scheme dividers. In the event that you pick a decent quality spring up, at that point your illustrations will look proficient. However, the principle issue with the spring up stand alternative is that it won't occupy the shell plot space. This implies you'll have clear dividers that you will be left attempting to load up with different arrangements. Additionally, the pop stand will be exceptionally constrained on the structure highlights it can oblige, so not the best method to get saw at a show.

 

As should be obvious, these alternatives have their restrictions. Be that as it may, all the more critically, they are actually what each other exhibitor with a shell scheme does.

 

Be that as it may, it doesn't need to be like this. You can show with a shell plan and still contend with organizations who have greater financial plans for their display stand plans and structures.

Think outside the box – how to make your shell scheme stand out

With endless reconfiguration possibilities, Quadrant2Design’s Prestige System allows you to create a variety of shapes and layouts for your stand. What is more, this structure allows you to include many bespoke features to promote your products or services.

Quadrant2Design’s highly talented designers have developed an amazing range of attention-grabbing design features that are unique to the Prestige System. Here are just a small number of their many unique eye-catching features you can use to transform your shell scheme into a custom-designed stand that will look far superior to your competitors:

•             High-Level Branding

With your ceiling grid gone, you have the chance to utilise this space with high-level branding at either 3.3 or 3.9 m.  This will not only make your stand much impressive but as the surrounding shell schemes will be at 2.4m, this help you to stand out as people will be able to see your branding from a considerable distance. 

•             High-Level Rotating Headers

But high-level branding doesn’t just have to be a case of just extending your stand upwards. You can be much more creative than that. Nothing attracts exhibition visitors like movement on a stand. Quadrant2Desgin’s branded rotating header feature – at a height of 3 meters and above – is the optimum feature for getting your stand noticed in a busy exhibition hall.

             3D-Effect Product Showcases

Display your products in the most inventive way with Quadrant2Design’s 3D-Effect showcases. Quadrant2Designers like to get creative with the range of shapes and graphics they can use to display products on client’s exhibition stands.

•             End of Wall Showcase

These “end of wall” showcases are perfect for displaying smaller products or literature that you want to highlight to people passing by. Also, displaying your products in the less obvious places of your exhibition stand makes your environment dynamic and interesting.

And as these showcases are at the front of your exhibition stand, they will catch the attention of visitors who might otherwise have walked past.

•             AV Displays

If you want to take your exhibition stand to the next level with an interactive TV presentation, then the Prestige stands are perfect for integrating AV equipment and screens. Whether it’s an i-pad, 60 inch TV or a full wall screen, Qudrant2Design can design their stands to incorporate different screen sizes for different purposes.

•             Photo-Flooring

Perhaps the most popular exhibiting innovation offered by Quadrant2design is their unique photo-flooring feature – which extends your wall graphics into the otherwise wasted floor space of your stand. 


A shell scheme comes with a carpet, but you can easily have this removed and our photo-flooring installed. Quadrant2Design are the only exhibition company to offer this design feature as an integral part of our service. So why not make the most of this offer by extending your stunning graphic display into your floor area?

So even if you are a small business with a modest shell scheme booth at an exhibition show, this doesn’t mean you can’t still exhibit with a creative custom-designed stand within this space. As the other exhibitors around you will most likely keep their shell scheme structures intact, your stand will look far more striking than your neighboring competitors.

 

 

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